2017

Award Recipients 2017

Award for Junior Faculty

Scott Moura, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Awards for Senior Faculty

David Card, Class of 1950 Professor of Economics
James Vernon, Professor, History

 

Award Recipient Bios

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Scott Moura, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

A fourth-year Assistant Professor, Scott Moura has distinguished himself as an outstanding researcher, instructor, and role model. His work focuses on maximizing the efficiency of interconnected mobility and energy networks in urban communities by developing advanced battery, building, and plug-in electric vehicle management systems. He has mentored no fewer than 25 graduate students and dozens of undergraduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and visiting scholars as the Director of the Energy, Controls and Applications Lab (eCAL). He provides a welcoming and inclusive environment for his students to thrive while ensuring that they persevere through their struggles. His colleagues enthusiastically praise his mentorship style, which enables students to overcome any academic or social barriers and “reach their full potential” to become “super-star” scholars in their field. As his first Ph.D. graduate puts it, “I have been able to achieve many technical accomplishments, obtain awards, influence the lives of others through several outreach activities, and accomplish leadership challenges which would not be possible without his guidance and dedication to my success. I will always look up to Dr. Moura as my role model.” Professor Moura serves as an inspiration to both his students and coworkers alike by his inexhaustible drive and dedication to ensure the success of those he meets, regardless of their background.

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Awards for Senior Faculty

David Card, Class of 1950 Professor of Economics

Professor David Card is not only a world-renowned economist and founding director of the Center for Labor Economics; he is also deeply invested in the teaching mission of his department and works with a large cohort of graduate students. For them he is a generous and caring mentor, who makes himself available at all times and sees them through from the inception, when the dissertation topic is devised, until the end and beyond, when he supports them as they launch their own careers. With his unwavering support and intellectual guidance, and with his patience and compassion when students struggle, he has formed generations of Ph.D. students, many of whom who have gone on to occupy senior positions the world over. Through the lunch working group meetings and other initiatives such as the weekly “labor therapy” meetings, he has created an intense intellectual and nurturing atmosphere in which his students thrive. In his 20 years at Berkeley, he has supervised or co-supervised more than 50 Ph.D. dissertations, in addition to serving on more than 100 Ph.D. committees Professor Card has had a tremendous impact not only on many individual lives but also on the field of labor economics and microeconomics. As one supporter wrote: “One of David’s traits as advisor that I admire the most is that he does not focus exclusively on the strongest, most brilliant students. He devotes even more time to help the weakest students… write the best research [they] can possibly write.” And another: “David takes true joy in helping his graduate students succeed in the way that parents take joy in seeing their children develop, thrive, and live to their fullest potential. As he has been for scores of others, he has been a source of inspiration in my career, including my service as provost of [an Ivy League] University.”
James Vernon, Professor, History

“His passion for graduate education is peerless.” The department praises his extraordinary work as a founding director of Berkeley’s Center for British Studies, his generosity in “keep afloat entire programs, including in Middle East and South Asian history,” and his inspired graduate curriculum reforms, including his key role in the creation of a new graduate field in Global History. A distinguished scholar of modern British history, James Vernon is as admired as he is trusted by his current and former graduate students. His mentoring skills are drawn from a rich palette: he encourages intellectual independence while insisting on work that meets the highest professional standards; he inspires with his own maverick intellect while “leading from behind”; he offers close and careful criticism of student work while building student confidence; he is a constantly available presence without micro-managing. Students praise his remarkable capacity “for helping students comprehend their own minds” and for bringing “order to the chaos that so often attends ideas in their early stages of development.” Endlessly patient, full of good humor and warmth, he “never treats the muddle brought to him as a muddle” in intellectual life. Professor Vernon is dedicated to every stage of graduate student careers: developing exam fields; securing grants and navigating restrictions on archives; offering brilliant feedback on multiple dissertation drafts; and supporting all aspects of job market preparation and early career struggles. His students have gone on to sterling academic positions, and never fail to mention the way that his humanity and compassion helped them to thrive and succeed. As one former student, now on the tenure track at a renowned Eastern college, wrote: “For all of us, James is the complete package. He’s the full-service wash and the all-season radial, the headlight on the foggy road and the roadmap for the lost. He’s the mentor with the mostest. It’s about time we told him.”


2016

Award Recipients 2016

Award for Junior Faculty

Laura Waller, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

Award for Senior Faculty

Catherine Albiston, Professor, Berkeley Law

 

Award Recipient Bios

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Laura Waller, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

In only her fourth year as an Assistant Professor, Laura Waller has already distinguished herself not only as a scientist but also as a graduate mentor. Professor Waller is an expert in the field of computational imaging, having invented a novel approach to optical systems. She runs a collaborative and interdisciplinary laboratory that her students have described as a great pedagogical and working environment. She garnered no fewer than 27 nominations for this award from graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and undergraduates. She provides the necessary support and training that allows her students to achieve a high level of productivity, and also shows compassion when students are struggling. A graduate student dealing with difficult life circumstances referred to Professor Waller as a savior, stating “it is because of her capacity to look past failure and to use failure as a means for discovering truth, that I was able to get past my own professional and personal roadblocks.” Professor Waller epitomizes an ideal graduate mentor, providing – in the words of several current graduate students – the creative insight, vision, career opportunities, enthusiasm, and encouragement for graduate studies at Berkeley.

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Catherine Albiston, Professor, Berkeley Law

Professor Catherine Albiston, a leading scholar in socio-legal studies, is a shining example of what it means to be a “student-centered” professor at UC Berkeley. Not only does she help her advisees fulfill their dreams but she also supports graduate students throughout the program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy (JSP). Her formal contributions to student life in JSP range from co-founder of the JSP Diversity Committee to Job Placement Coordinator to Head Graduate Advisor to Graduate Equity Advisor. Her students appreciate that she demands academic excellence and provides the means to achieve it with rigorous, timely critique of their scholarship and a nurturing, family-friendly environment. As a former advisee noted: “She never fails to provide both the most incisive critique you’ll get on a paper and the most constructive and helpful suggestions for redeeming yourself.” Professor Albiston’s mentorship is not limited to her advisees. Several of the nominators noted the exceptional nature of her input as a committee member and second reader. Others mentioned the “tremendous boon” that she provided by establishing a new interdisciplinary writing workshop in JSP that helped graduate students at all stages of their studies to hone their craft. Professor Albiston inspires both her students and colleagues by her commitment to the next generation of scholars.


2015

Award Recipients 2015

Award for Junior Faculty

Alison Post, Assistant Professor, Political Science, and Global Metropolitan Studies

Award for Senior Faculty

Edward Miguel, Professor, Economics

 

Award Recipient Bios

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Alison Post, Assistant Professor, Political Science, and Global Metropolitan Studies

Applying intelligence, professional experience, and smiling kindness, Professor Alison Post has distinguished herself as a leading graduate student mentor in Political Science and related disciplines. Setting an example for other junior professors in balancing research with service, Professor Post understands that true mentorship is not an academic exercise. She combines brilliance in her own research and an interdisciplinary perspective with a proven talent for keeping the student’s confidence intact, even as she moves them beyond their intellectual comfort zones. As one appreciative Ph.D. candidate remarked, “Alison is both a demanding advisor and a trusted mentor who always has my best intellectual and professional interests at heart.” Professor Post is respected for helping to orient students long before their arrival at UC Berkeley, for continuing to help others as they move through the dissertation process,for joining with her students in co-authored papers, and for providing ongoing advice as the graduates move into the professional world. She exemplifies humane compassion without sacrificing a demand that her students reach for the highest level of academic accomplishment and professional integrity. Professor Post understands that quality scholarship and a balanced life go hand in hand. An important role model for women in the field of Political Science, Alison Post is an inspiration to many.

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Edward Miguel, Professor, Economics

Edward Miguel combines his passions for excellence in scholarly research and his outstanding classroom teaching in a novel model of graduate mentorship. Professor Miguel implements interdisciplinary, community-based mentoring that has been successful in guiding a large and diverse group of graduate students. This model is being replicated elsewhere across the country. A nominator wrote: “Professor Miguel creates communities of open and constructive exchange among his students and within the broader research community.” In doing so he has transformed the field of development economics into one of the most thriving fields of study in the Economics Department, largely through his mentoring of graduate students. Professor Miguel devotes a great deal of time and effort to mentoring these students to achieve their maximum potential, deeply engaging with his students and their work while also providing numerous opportunities for professional development. He has been an innovator in introducing the rigors of data science to his students, placing his advisees among an elite group of young economists who are experimenting with new norms and methods. He is notable for advising his students through all stages of their successful careers, whether in academia, government, NGOs, or the private sector. Edward Miguel’s commitment to human development, evidenced both in his own research and his investment in Berkeley graduate students, makes him an outstanding mentor.


2014

Award Recipients 2014

Award for Junior Faculty

Clayton Critcher, Assistant Professor, Haas School of Business

Award for Senior Faculty

Cathryn Carson, Professor, History
Linda Williams, Professor, Film and Media Studies and Rhetoric

 

Award Recipient Bios

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Clayton Critcher, Assistant Professor, Haas School of Business

Clayton Critcher’s effect as a mentor is immediate and enduring; he is both rigorous and caring; he is patient, while holding those around him to high ethical standards. Since his arrival at Berkeley in 2010, he has had a transformative impact on the atmosphere around him at Haas, bringing a spirit of collaboration to a diverse and independent set of people. The weekly lab meetings he instituted soon after his arrival have become an intense hub of intellectual connection, drawing people not only from the Haas School, but from other Berkeley departments such as Psychology, as well as from other institutions. Both in those lab meetings and in his one-on-one interactions, he shares his intense intellectual gifts with characteristic warmth and generosity. If he demands intellectual rigor, he also provides emotional and social support. Within minutes of meeting someone, he will inevitably be brainstorming with them about ideas and methods. From that initial moment on, he is a dependable presence in his students’ lives. His feedback is a steady resource at every stage of a project. His enthusiasm and collaborative spirit help sustain the energy of his collaborators and push them to new levels of rigor and intellectual sophistication. His particular combination of brilliance and devotion have, in very short order, made him an outstanding mentor of graduate students.

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Cathryn Carson, Professor, History

Professor Cathryn Carson is an exceptional mentor and an outstanding scholar, while also finding time to provide significant Campus service as Associate Dean, Social Sciences and (until 2009) Director of Office for History of Science and Technology. She has managed to turn these commitments into opportunities for her students to engage with recent developments in their field and to contribute to the social sciences. Her students praise her attentiveness and warmth; her ability to refer to conversations with students from months and even years earlier shows the thought she puts into their interactions. Her exacting standards and extreme care for detail are evident in her mentoring style, as in her research. The clarity and precision of her feedback to students is legendary, helping to instill in them confidence in their own work: “If Cathryn okays it, it must be good.” While helping students become scholars, she teaches by example how to be a colleague and a professional. She provides emotional support and wise advice for students confronting personal or professional difficulties. In all respects she is an exemplary mentor.

Linda Williams, Professor, Film and Media Studies and Rhetoric

Linda Williams has led an illustrious career at UC Berkeley and beyond, exploring controversial topics, teaching in Film and Media studies, and currently holding a joint appoint in Film and in Rhetoric. Noted and praised for being committed to her graduate students’ success and mastery of all aspects of their field, including teaching, Linda has supported many of her students to go on to become excellent academic instructors while fostering their individual development with wisdom and alacrity. Whether working closely with students for Qualifying Exams, mentoring, or organizing the Visual Cultures Writing Group to help cultivate their academic writing, her students note her warmth, joy and passion for helping people flourish. Again and again Linda’s ability to give valuable practical advice and her generosity with her time have been distinguished as endearing her to her students, colleagues and contemporaries. Her advice travels with them long beyond their time at Berkeley, supporting them into their futures and future careers.


2013

Award Recipients 2013

Award for Junior Faculty

Leonardo Arriola, Assistant Professor, Political Science

Award for Senior Faculty

Robert Bergman, Professor, Chemistry
Raka Ray, Professor, Sociology and South and Southeast Asian Studies

 

Award Recipient Bios

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Leonardo Arriola, Assistant Professor, Political Science

Leonardo Arriola is an exemplary graduate mentor, one whose wealth of knowledge and academic rigor is matched by his kindness and committment to every aspect of his students professional and personal development. Professor Arriola’s infectious passion for the study of African politics not only inspire students, but have also allowed them to frame and develop methodologically innovative projects of their own. He painstakingly pushes his students to attain exacting standards in their scholarship by providing voluminous and hugely helpful critiques of their written work. Since joining the Berkeley faculty as an assistant professor in 2008, Arriola has almost single-handedly sustained a community of scholars of African politics at Berkeley. At the same time, his engaged mentorship and far-reaching intellectual breadth has drawn an unusually large and diverse group of students, not only from his own field, but also from several sub-fields and disciplines across campus. His students and colleagues alike laud him as a brilliant, welcoming, and exceptionally dedicated mentor.

Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Robert Bergman, Professor, Chemistry

Professor Bergman has had a long and very distinguished career to date; several have noted that he is a strong candidate for a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Among his many accomplishments, he is an exceptional mentor to graduate students. He has guided about 270 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows through the rigors of their academic programs and continues to provide advice and support throughout their careers. Many of Professor Bergman’s mentees have gone on to highly distinguished careers in academia and industry. A frequent comment from his former graduate students is that Professor Bergman is deeply engaged with every student, provides an environment that allows each to flourish, and guides everyone to their full potential. Professor Bergman is also inspirational to his students as a mentor who pursues excellence in research but also whose concern for broader societal issues led him to establish the Green Chemistry initiative on campus, and whose enthusiasm for teaching and outreach led him to establish the BASIS program that engages graduate students in bringing science activities to the local school systems.

Raka Ray, Professor, Sociology and South and Southeast Asian Studies

Raka Ray is a committed mentor with the capacity to energize and inspire her students. Her supportive guidance has benefitted students from across campus, as in addition to serving as Chair of the Department of Sociology, she holds an appointment in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies. Her students and colleagues describe her as approachable and willing to listen, and guided by her excellent instincts and a strong moral compass. Her field-leading work in the sociology of gender has inspired the intellectual inquiry of countless students, and her commitment to their growth as scholars has propelled her students on to receive awards for dissertations and papers and to secure prestigious positions after their time at Berkeley. Raka is known for mentoring former students well into their careers, and for instilling not only the virtue of mentorship in those who have benefitted from her guidance, but the skills to be effective mentors themselves.


2012

Award Recipients 2012

Award for Junior Faculty

Jake Kosek, Assistant Professor, Geography

Award for Senior Faculty

Nancy Peluso, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Bernd Sturmfels, Professor, Mathematics

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Jake Kosek, Assistant Professor, Geography

Jake Kosek is an intellectual role model with a kind and generous personality, attentive to each of his students as individual thinkers and human beings. He pushes students to their intellectual limits while providing tremendous support. His conceptual power and scope free the creativity of each student while guiding them toward rigorous engagement with disciplinary scholarship. Since beginning as a Berkeley faculty member in 2008, he has been inundated by students from across the campus. He developed and taught three new graduate seminars on topics of cultural, environmental and political geography, and has received the very top evaluations for his graduate seminars and for his contributing membership on numerous doctoral oral and dissertation committees. Students and colleagues alike describe him as a truly brilliant, inspired and inspiring mentor.

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Nancy Peluso, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Nancy Peluso’s mentorship is defined by her unending dedication to and compassion for all students around her. Nancy takes on any amount of extra work necessary to see graduate students succeed. When graduate students in her discipline ask for a new course to meet their evolving academic needs, Nancy responds by not only developing the new course but by teaching it. Her students note that she not only teaches them how to answer questions but how to ask them. Nancy instills students with a sense of confidence and grounding, treating them as intellectual equals, and the emotional support that she extends to students in critical times of need far surpasses the role of a typical mentor. In short, many distinguished mentors may have moved metaphorical mountains to help graduate students succeed, but only Nancy has, quite literally, trekked to the top of one. Clearly, Nancy does not just meet the standards for a distinguished graduate student mentor—she redefines them.

Bernd Sturmfels, Professor, Mathematics

Bernd Sturmfels  is a phenomenal adviser who has shaped the lives and careers of many mathematicians and scientists. Empowering students from around the world, both men and women, to take on extra responsibilities as they become leaders in the field of mathematics, Sturmfels goes further by continually matching just the right mathematical problems with just the right people.  “As if by magic”, he knows which problems are suitable for whom. He does this by engaging with students and peers in a deep and genuine fashion, probing interests, listening, remembering.  A highly accomplished leader in his research field, Sturmfels nevertheless continues to engage new generations of students, here and abroad, year after year. The influence of this truly outstanding mentor reaches far beyond Berkeley, in both space and time. 


2011

Award Recipients 2011

Award for Junior Faculty

Maria Paz Gutierrez, Assistant Professor, Architecture

Award for Senior Faculty

Irina Paperno, Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Maria Paz Gutierrez, Assistant Professor, Architecture
Inspirational, motivational and pioneering are common descriptions of Maria Paz Gutierrez and her mentorship style. She inspires students not only as a distinguished researcher and innovator in her own field of architecture, but also by reaching across disciplines to build collaborations that benefit her students and students in other departments. She ignites confidence and nurtures ambition by taking personal interest in the academic, professional and all-around development of graduate and undergraduate students alike. That includes seeking outside support to create opportunities for students to showcase their work. In her studio classes, and in 1-on-1 conversations, her students describe her as a generous source of advice and constructive criticism who has made a critical impact on the ethos of her entire school.

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Senior Faculty

Irina Paperno, Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Irena Paperno has transformed Berkeley’s Slavic Department into the leading interdisciplinary program in the country, according to all reports. She spearheaded curricular reform such that graduate students acquire extensive breadth relevant to their intellectual interests. Her community also inspires and encourages graduate students in several allied departments.  Pragmatically, she established a constructive student progress assessment system; intellectually, she is a critic who “braces” students and their work, and thereby the discipline. Paperno is a sought-after mentor whose ability to open the minds of students has resulted in a rich body of interdisciplinary work.  She projects a moral dedication to scholarship and its integration into all aspects of life. Energy, rigor, and drive characterize her intense commitment to students and to scholarship.


2010

Award Recipients 2010

Award for Junior Faculty

Mark Healey, Assistant Professor, History

Award for Faculty

Louise Fortmann, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management
Kent Lightfoot, Professor, Anthropology

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Mark Healey, Assistant Professor, History
Across many fields — History, Latin American Studies, Anthropology, etc. — Mark Healey provides intellectual inspiration, tireless guidance through the demanding graduate experience and genuine enthusiasm for his students’ nascent projects. In dialogue Mark is a “friendly but severe critic” who engages students with “just the right amount of leeway and necessary pressure.” While mentoring a staggering number of individuals from different departments, he devised a system that guarantees full support for all entering graduate students in History. Numerous letters tell of a rare combination of “erudition, approachability and empathy” that serves as a model of mentorship for the entire campus.

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Faculty

Louise Fortmann, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management
It is clear that graduate students flock to Louise Fortmann for more than her endless stash of tea and fancy chocolate. She is utterly dedicated to her students: as one nominator remarked, “Once you are a student of Louise Fortmann… you are never far from her thoughts.” Fortmann is a strong advocate for gender equity and interdisciplinary research, building bridges not only among different academic fields, but also between academics and the communities that sustain their research. Perhaps most importantly, she has fostered a supportive environment where her students feel safe enough to share and discuss their ideas and their lives, developing confidence essential to success, and beginning to see themselves as serious scholars.

Kent Lightfoot, Professor, Anthropology
Kent Lightfoot is widely regarded as an “unfailingly kind and generous” mentor who practices “vertical mentoring” such that current and former students constitute “a strong and durable intellectual community”.  He is considered “a model for the ethical practice of archaeology” and his projects and practices have “re-shap[ed] the entire discipline.”  His sensitive, respectful involvement of native peoples as collaborators and his advancement of members of under-represented groups have had great impact both on students and on archaeology. His ability “to intervene in intellectual debates in constructive ways,” coupled with intellectual rigor, a sense of humor, and deep commitment, exerts a strong and steady influence on his students, present and past.


2009

Award Recipients 2009

Award for Junior Faculty

Amani Nuru-Jeter, Assistant Professor, Public Health

Award for Faculty

Marianne Constable, Professor, Rhetoric

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Amani Nuru-Jeter, Assistant Professor, Public Health
In only four years at Berkeley, Amani Nuru-Jeter’s passion for research, electrifying presence in the classroom, and wise mentoring have transformed the experience of studying social epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Testimonials extol her as a role model, particularly for young women students and students of color, and credit the professional success of graduates in diverse settings to her encouragement, high standards, and challenging criticism. “(H)er vibrant energy, her appreciation for you as a person, her critical knowledge of her discipline and the world of research, and her dedication,” one student concluded, “help you attain your goals.”

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Faculty

Marianne Constable, Professor, Rhetoric
Marianne Constable has enabled young scholars, at Berkeley and beyond, to achieve innovative multi-disciplinary examinations of law, philosophy, and society through her extraordinary intellectual generosity, lucid criticism, and what one student aptly termed “a staggering degree of dedication.”  Her advocacy for difficult students and those confronting difficulties combined with the example of her own lively passion for knowledge has made Constable a “beacon of inspiration.”  Dozens of moving letters expressed gratitude for Professor Constable’s pragmatic guidance, deep loyalty, and, especially, the “handwritten roadmaps” that clarified the way forward for students struggling to find their own voice as scholars.


2008

Award Recipients 2008

Award for Junior Faculty

Irene Bloemraad, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

Award for Faculty

Susanna Barrows, Professor, Department of History
Alexandre Chorin, Professor, Department of Mathematics

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Irene Bloemraad, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
In only five years in Berkeley, Irene Bloemraad has already deeply influenced the development of graduate students in multiple departments. The Immigration Workshop which she created gives students from Sociology, Law, Political Science, Social Welfare, and History access to an interdisciplinary scholarly community, and also trains students in the nuts and bolts of professional activity. Testimonials from former students single out her ability to provide “hard-headed constructive criticism”, and to recognize and nurture the potential within a young scholar, as keys to her success.

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Faculty

Susanna Barrows, Professor, Department of History
Susanna Barrows is the leading PhD mentor of her generation in modern French history, and has reshaped the field through the work of her students, the products of “l’usine Barrows”, who now grace the faculties of numerous major universities. Professor Barrows has a singular genius for the nurturing of creativity and deep inquiry, for enabling young scholars to find their own voices; yet at the same time, she has fostered a deep sense of a productive community among her students. “Her gifts”, wrote one former student, “keep on giving” throughout a lifetime.

Alexandre Chorin, Professor, Department of Mathematics
During a 35-year career at Berkeley, which has been distinguished in all facets, Alexandre Chorin has mentored 48 PhD students, who have gone on to become leaders in academia, in the national laboratories, and in industry. Themes emerging from testimonials from 25 of these students include Professor Chorin’s natural penchant for teaching by example, his accessibility, his deep concern for all aspects of his students’ lives and development, and above all, his extraordinary ability to nurture independence and creativity.


2007

Award Recipients 2007

Award for Faculty

José David Saldívar, Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies

Award for Junior Faculty

Sofia Berto Villas-Boas, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics
Maximilian Auffhammer, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics

 

Award Recipient Bios

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Faculty

José David Saldívar, Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies
Professor Saldívar is a celebrated expert in the field of Chicano/a Studies whose mentorship has produced some of the finest scholars in this new and growing field. Many of his current and former students have faced the additional challenge of entering the academia as people of color from underprivileged backgrounds. Professor Saldívar has taught them how to navigate the process of academic credentialing and professionalization. His dedication, kindness, and openness have extended to graduate students at Berkeley as well as other universities. Several letter writers described how their first meeting with Professor Saldívar at an academic conference resulted in a long mentoring relationship that has shaped not only their scholarship and their careers, but also their own outlook on how to be a teacher.

Sarlo Distinguished Graduate Student Mentoring Award for Junior Faculty

Sofia Berto Villas-Boas, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics

Maximilian Auffhammer, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics
Sofia Berto Villas-Boas and Maximilian Auffhammer jointly instituted a new graduate student mentoring program in the Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics. The program is a year-long job placement seminar intended to prepare graduate students for the academic job market. The students receive feedback on their job applications and job talks. They also have an opportunity to do mock interviews. The program was voluntarily created by Professors Villas-Boas and Auffhammer who wanted to share what they themselves learned from having recently gone through the job search process. It required a significant time commitment and dedication on their part. As a result of the program, the department has had a 100% placement record in the last four years, with students securing positions in leading economics departments in the country and research organizations worldwide.